Need a Break? Getting Away as the Pandemic Drags On

Do you need a break? 

That’s probably a silly question. We all need a break. Whether you’ve spent much of the last 12 months holding your breath, or you think you’re fine, the reality is that you could probably do with a getaway.

So we’ve got a few suggestions for spring and summer getaways. No matter your current comfort level with being out and about, you’re sure to find an idea that suits you.

1. Go camping

This is probably the most pandemic-friendly getaway option—and the most budget-friendly. As spring spreads through the country, what better way to recharge than to pitch a tent in the great outdoors and cook your dinner over a fire? Leave the electronic devices at home (or in your glove box) and enjoy the sights, sounds and smells of nature.

And as a bonus, this type of getaway is scientifically proven to lower your stress levels. Here’s a list of the best campgrounds in the country, organized by state.

2. Rent an RV

If you’re concerned about staying in hotels, renting an RV might be the way to go. Recent CDC guidance suggests that you’re not likely to get COVID from touching the same surface that an infected person touched, so there’s really no risk of traveling via RV. 

So grab your favorite people and hit the road. This country is beautiful and there are so many places worth exploring. From the western national parks to the eastern shores and all the landscape in between, the destination possibilities are almost endless. Here’s a list to get you started.

3. Rent an Airbnb

Given that aforementioned CDC guidance, staying at a private vacation home is low-risk as well. And there are so many amazing private homes for rent. 

Check out this list of the most incredible Airbnb’s in the United States for ideas. From a Hobbit-themed Oregon abode to South Carolina houseboat, there are so many whimsical options.  

It’s time you had a break. So what are you waiting for? Get planning!

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Couples Surviving the Pandemic: A COVID-19 Story

It’s been more than a year since coronavirus became a household word. The pandemic has laid bare the strength (or lack thereof) of many an institution. From public schools to your corner deli, there’s a fine line between the organizations that have survived and those that have crumpled. 

This is true also of relationships. A new study by a relationship coaching company surveyed more 1,700 people in long-term relationships. And some 68% of respondents who had separated from their partners this year reported that it was due to the pandemic. But while the study found that the pandemic has been a big stressor for couples, it also drew some interesting conclusions about the habits of couples surviving the pandemic.

“Our results tell the story of two different types of couples—those who are struggling and growing further apart, and those who are adapting and growing closer together,” the study reads.

What worked?

When asked “What has been helpful for your relationship during the COVID-19 pandemic?” the people who considered themselves the happiest in their relationships answered with one of these five options:

These are already all positive-sounding things, but now that we know they are associated with relationships that have survived the pandemic, they’re looking like really great ways to spend time together.

What didn’t?

Wondering about the other side of the coin? Those who identified themselves as being unhappy in their relationships answered with these options:

There is nothing wrong with any of these things on their own. However, looking at this list, most of the items are not conducive to quality time together. It’s great to connect with old friends and have some quality time alone, but make sure you’re tending to your relationship, too. As the study showed, that effort can pay off.

“Overall,” the study concludes, “we can see that—for some couples—this year has helped them to develop resilience and grow in a way they may not have predicted. In the words of one of our survey respondents—‘you can’t make diamonds without a little pressure.’” Resilience seems to be a winning skill for couples surviving the pandemic. 

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